24 Hours in Paris with Loli Events

Both French born, Lauren Fremont and Coralie Prats of Loli Events make gracious living their business. Dempsey & Carroll’s Austin Ackles asked them to share their favorite haunts in our beloved Paris for you to keep in mind for your next trip to the City of Lights!

Where to Stay

Pavillon de la Reine

Where to Eat and Drink

  • Les petits cafés: My love for coffee shops is endless, and thankfully Paris is full of them! My favorite is the Saint Regis Café on Ile Saint Louis because of its authentic style and location–the servers are super fun and the coffee is really good too!
  • Fine Dining: Le Meurice Alain Ducasse is located inside the Palace Hotel Le Meurice and it is truly stunning. Walking into this restaurant is already an experience in itself!
Le Meurice Alain Ducasse

The grand dining room at Le Meurice Alain Ducasse

  • Cocktails: Le Moonshiner is a speakeasy on Rue Sedaine and it is the best place in Paris to drink a good whiskey cocktail! The hidden entrance and retro decor make for a memorable night out.

Le Moonshiner

What to See

  • La Seine Banks: It is always interesting to wander along The River Seine, especially around the two islands, Ile de la Cité and Ile Saint Louis, and along Saint Germain. You will find all kinds of people; joggers, old people with their dogs, lovers, artists, and workers on their way to the office.  During sunsets, the buildings turn into gold and the sky softens with gorgeous shades of pink–I will never get enough of it!

Sylvie-Gil-La Seine

  • The Square Georges-Cain: This is my favorite place in my beloved neighborhood, Le Marais. It is a lovely park in front of a beautiful building and it’s very well maintained–It’s my little heaven on Earth! The location on a quiet street makes it the ideal place to relax outside in the nice weather. The Square George Cain

 

  • Paris doors: How can we not talk about these huge and colorful street doors? I have so many blue doors photos on my phone–they are all different and all majestic!
  • Old little streets & Passages: Paris used to be so differentPassage des Princes back in the day! I’m always very nostalgic when I find a little street and picture the whole city before Haussmann’s renovation in the 19th century. Thankfully, we still have the beautiful Passages like two favorites: Galerie Vivienne and Passage des Princes!
  • Museums: Musée Jacquemart-André is a beautiful hotel particulier in Paris that offers a large collection of private paintings and antique furniture. The grand townhouse is divided into five major parts and it is a wonderful place to explore.

Musée Jacquemart-André

Merci to Lauren and Coralie for letting us in on a few of their Paris favorites!

Where are your favorite destinations to visit in Paris or other cities around the world? Discover our Jet Set Collection to inspire your next trip and use the #DestinationDempsey hashtag on social media to share your travels. 

A spotlight on Lauren Sozmen

Dempsey & Carroll event curator Austin Ackles sat down with Lauren Sozmen of Loli Events to discuss her events between New York & Paris.

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AA: We just worked together on a wedding that had mountains of paper and everything went so smoothly! What was your secret weapon for keeping those clients so perfectly on schedule?

LS: I believe it was a mix of using the excellent timeline that you gave me at the beginning, and then sending gentle yet firm reminders to the client for each deadline throughout the process. Don’t give the client a whole list of due dates, this will overwhelm them. Tackle each project and tell them exactly when you need answers and decisions by.

AA: You’re working a lot in France. What’s the biggest difference you find when working abroad as opposed to NYC?

LS: We started Loli Events in France about two years ago.  One of the biggest differences is the pace.  Here in NYC we expect today’s answers yesterday, its go go go everyday.  In France, vendors know how to slow down a bit more and will get the work done but not in a NY minute.

AA: What’s easier in New York City? What’s easier in Paris?

LS: In New York City there’s a huge resource of vendors. You can literally find a great service or product for anything & everything. Working in Paris, you have so much built in decor and beauty everywhere that even if you were on a random little street, photos would be exquisite and transporting.

AA: You have a fine arts background. What’s your favorite museum in New York? Your favorite in Paris?

LS: In New York, The Frick Collection!  It is a magical place in the most beautiful part of the city.  The nineteenth-century paintings are my favorite. In Paris, my favorite is Le Musee de l’Orangerie. It is located in the Tuileries Gardens (also a favorite part of town) and I could spend hours just staring at Claude Monet’s Water Lilies.

AA: Has Loli’s mascot, Truffle, strolled along the Seine?

LS: Alas no…. Truffle has never even been on a plane.  When Loli is in Paris… Truffle usually stays in Brooklyn with his dad. That being said, I am sure he would love Les Rue de Paris.

AA: Finally, is there a particular piece of wedding paper that you really love, but most of your clients don’t usually include for their wedding dapacecardy?

LS: I wish everyone did place cards not just escort cards… think it is such a personal touch to any great event no matter how big or small.

 

 

Writing Away from Far Away

When you sit in a café, not a chain, rather a proper authentic café anywhere in the world you immediately feel immersed in the culture – the vibe of the city permeates all of your senses. The smell of the streets, the architecture, the temperature, the preferred culinary anchors – if you are receptive it can be intoxicating. It’s no different for me as I sit at the Parisian café, L’anticafé.

 

photo 1

 

L’ anticafé is not the average French cafe. Aside from lacking outdoor seating, it is not full of tourists or menus in multiple languages despite being tucked away in the 1st arrondisement behind the Louvre. In fact, it has no menu at all. L’anticafé differs further from the typical French café —  instead of paying a ridiculous sum for a small cup of coffee, you pay by the hour and can consume as much coffee or tea as you want.  They also have snacks and free wifi. So, for five euro, I selected a long wooden table that I had all to myself and ordered my first latte.

 

I pulled out my stack of stationery and envelopes and started writing to my friends back at home. As the waitress approached me with my latte she commented, “I don’t see young people writing letters often. It’s inspiring to see your papers instead of the screens everyone else in the cafe is staring at.”

 

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Personal communication – touching someone with more thought then the fleeting moment of a text is perhaps a universal craving. We have become detached. Rather than sending emails and text to my friends and family back in the states I write letters to them. I savor the time to share my experience in Paris in a thoughtful manner. No distractions, no clicks, beeps, popups – just me, my latte, pen, and paper.

 

Sammy Marrus

 

 

The Lives of Others

The past has a funny way of looping back around to land firmly in the present. When we think of time capsules we think of recorded voices on cassette tapes; thumb drives chock full of information spanning millennia; a velvet poster of Elvis Presley or an original taping of the moon landing, all buried in concrete beneath the earth or tucked away in some official storage facility in Pennsylvania.

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But sometimes the past is written with a fine-tipped fountain pen on robin’s egg blue paper by a Frenchwoman to her little sister in September of 1920. I stumbled across this vintage missive in December of 2009 while on the hunt for a Christmas present for my artist stepmother. Stopping into one of my favorite boutiques in my hometown of Ashland, OR, I knew I was bound to find something at Prize, the chic storefront owned and curated by Jennifer. The shop is gorgeous from floor to ceiling, featuring everything from antique diamond necklaces to a library of vintage James Bond novels and contemporary children’s books. Between bags of pastel-colored candies tied off with gold ribbon and lavender saché pillows handmade in Provence, I happened upon a glass bowl filled with an array of old letters. As a writer and as a history lover, I could not resist the allure of vintage stationery. Upon closer inspection – and to my continuing delight – I found myself facing a treasure trove: Jennifer had brought back from a recent trip to Paris an assortment of handwritten letters from the turn of the 20th century. Most were near-mint and absolutely stunning. I selected two for purchase; one I kept, and the other – written in an elegant script on soft rose pink paper – I gave to my stepmother to use in her future art projects.

The letter I have kept for the last five years was eighty-nine years old when I bought it in 2009. Now approaching its 100th birthday, I have only managed to translate a smattering of words, but the contents of the letter written to a sister seem inconsequential compared to the existence of the letter, itself. To have something as beautiful as this finely penned letter (written, I’d like to think, on a rainy spring day in Paris, in the early afternoon over an espresso served in a gold-rimmed ceramic cup) in my possession feels like owning a snapshot of history told in words, an elegant and mysterious time capsule brought into the present still bearing the love and care of the writer nearly one hundred years later.

Rachel Kambury,

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Share your own letters from the past on Instagram and be sure to tag @dempseycarroll. We would love to see your letters, notes, and post it-notes!